Community

The UA Debate Series is made up of competition-winning student interns who strive to connect the college to the community through debate and discourse. All attendees of the following debate can participate by asking questions and contributing to the conversation about our topics, along with voting for the victor, who wins based off of changing the most minds of audience members. We encourage a diverse mix of students, staff, faculty, and community members to participate in the Q&A portion of our Oxford Style debate.

Resolved: Prisoners should be given access to a college education during incarceration. AND For-profit prisons should be banned.

In a two-part event, we will be discussing both whether prisoners should be given access to a college education during incarceration, and whether for-profit prisons should be banned. Many prisoners have a difficult time adjusting to life after serving time, and a college education may help them through that adjustment. Because a vast majority of prisoners come from low-income areas, education may not have been a viable possibility, so should our prisons pick up the slack? This leads to the prison industrial complex and the issue of for-profit prisons. The question here is whether the a profit motive should be included in the justice system at all. In addition, the ban of for-profit prisons would force the system to take a look at the racial disparities in the system, making it more fair and just. The prison system in itself has many issues and forcing everyone to ask themselves these questions may serve to eradicate the problem.

When

7 p.m. April 23, 2019

Where

College of Law, Room 160

Join us in celebrating The Feminist Wire Books: Connecting Feminisms, Race, and Social Justice with series editors Tamura A. Lomax and Monica J. Casper and special remarks from University of Arizona Press Editor-in-Chief Kristen Buckles. The Feminist Wire Books is a new series from The Feminist Wire(TFW) and the University of Arizona Press dedicated to the sociopolitical and cultural critique of anti-feminist, racist, and imperialist politics.

Readings and panel discussions:

Marquis Bey, Author
Them Goon Rules: Fugitive Essays on Radical Black Feminism

Michelle TéllezJudith Pérez-Torres, and Christina Vega, Editors
The Chicana Motherwork Anthology: Porque sin madres no hay revolución

Julia Jordan-Zachery and Duchess Harris, Editors
Black Girl Magic Beyond the Hashtag: Twenty-First Century Acts of Self-Definition (forthcoming Fall 2019)

The event is free and open to the public, and books will be available for purchase at a reception following the program.

The program is co-sponsored by the Univeristy of Arizona Press, the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, the University Libraries, the Office of the Provost, the department of Gender & Women’s Studies, the department of Africana Studies, and the department of Religious Studies and Classics.

 

When

5:30 p.m. April 10, 2019

Where

Gender and Women's Studies, 925 N. Tyndall Ave. Room 100

The UA Debate Series is made up of competition-winning student interns who strive to connect the college to the community through debate and discourse. All attendees of the following debate can participate by asking questions and contributing to the conversation about our topics, along with voting for the victor, who wins based off of changing the most minds of audience members. We encourage a diverse mix of students, staff, faculty, and community members to participate in the Q&A portion of our Oxford Style debate.

Resolved: Tuition should be free for students attending two-year community/technical colleges.

College tuition has always been a touchy subject, so many people have been raising the idea that tuition should be free for those who attend two-year/technical colleges since most students who decide to attend these schools, take the money into consideration. Many families struggle to send their children to four year universities, as well as two-year/technical colleges. Allowing these student’s tuition to be covered would allow so many more students the opportunity to further their education, without the constant worry of paying off the fees. On the other hand, many also argue that students who attend Four year Universities should have tuition free school because of their desire to further the education but the same worry of not having the funds or needing to take out mountains of loans.

When

7 p.m. April 9, 2019

Where

College of Law, Room 160

Discover nature, rediscover yourself.

Explore the stunning beauty of the Sonoran Desert through the lens of mindfulness and joyful play. This facilitated hike will include opportunities to move your body, open your heart and calm your mind as you explore and play in pairs and groups in facilitated activities to deepen your relationship with the natural world. Come and renew with us in the Tucson Mountains!

Who Can Attend?

Everyone is welcomed. Minimum age 18. You should be comfortable to hike on uneven terrain and with a full day's outing.

Cost

$20

Transportation

Transportation provided or you may provide your own. We will all meet at Campus Recreation prior to departure.

More Information

See event details

 

Register

 

When

8 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 6, 2019

Where

Meet at UA Campus Recreation

Professor Neda Maghbouleh is the winner of the 2018 Ontario Early Researcher Award for her work on racialized immigrants and refugees in North America, and the author of The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race (Stanford University Press, 2017).The talk at the annual Taleghani event will be based on the content of this book.

Founded in May 2010, the Dr. Malakeh Taleghani Graduate Endowment in Iranian Studies funds outstanding graduate research in all areas of Iranian studies, including Persian literature, anthropology, history, geography, political science, and music; Iranian art and architecture, and Iranian languages and linguistics. Due to the generosity of family and friends, the endowment has grown tremendously since its creation.

 

In connection with the endowment, the Taleghani Lecture Series is sponsored by Prof. Simin Karimi and presented by the UA Department of Linguistics. Each year a prominent scholar in Iranian studies is invited to present a public lecture and hold a seminar for graduate and undergraduate students. The goal of the lecture series is to create awareness about various aspects of Iran and the Iranian culture among Americans and young Iranians, an issue that was very close to Dr. Taleghani’s heart

When

7 p.m. April 4, 2019

Where

Sonora Room, Student Union

In this talk, Carlton Turner will use the work of Sipp Culture as a framework for how rural communities are grappling with reimagining their cultural identity in the wake of systems consolidation (educational, medical, and food) and the expanding of the digital divide across race and class lines.

When

6 p.m. April 1, 2019

Where

Dunbar Pavilion-Dining Hall (325 W. 2nd St, Tucson AZ 85705)

The newly-created Saber es Poder Academic Excellence Award in Mexican American Studies recognizes and celebrates an outstanding scholar whose work has demonstrated a long-term commitment to advancing the field of Mexican American Studies. This annual award, which comes with a $10,000 prize, grew out of a grassroots collaboration between the University of Arizona’s Department of Mexican American Studies, Fundación México, a local Tucson nonprofit, and the Consulate of Mexico in Tucson. Our collective vision is to sustain this annual award in perpetuity through private philanthropy.

See event details

 

Get Tickets

When

5:30 p.m. March 30, 2019

Where

Marriot Hotel Main Gate Square, 880 E. 2nd Street Tucson, AZ 85719

As Central American migration roils national politics in the US, debates have arisen about whether human-induced climate change is displacing increasing numbers of people from that region. The scholars and researchers on this panel provide an in-depth discussion of this issue and its policy implications.

When

1 p.m. March 29, 2019

Where

ENR2 S107

Co-presented by the Care, Health & Society program in the University of Arizona School of Sociology and The Loft Cinema.

Featuring a post-film panel discussion with Jacqueline Bloink, Health Compliance Expert and Care, Health & Society faculty; and W. Daniel Shelton, Managing Attorney, Medical Malpractice Section, Goldberg & Osborne Law Firm. 

In this deliriously dark comedy, starring George C. Scott and featuring a biting, Oscar-winning screenplay by Paddy Chayefsky, a New York City hospital teeters on the verge of complete chaos thanks to an inept staff, bureaucratic absurdity and a rash of mysterious murders. Dr. Herbert Bock (George C. Scott), the Chief Resident at a sprawling, chaotic New York City hospital, is on the verge of a crack-up. Recently divorced, estranged from his children, overworked, and impotent, he is no longer the man he used to be, namely, one who enjoyed a reputation as a medical genius. To complicate matters, members of Bock’s hospital staff are dying under mysterious circumstances, suggesting a lunatic may be on the loose. The gallows humor of The Hospital was years ahead of its time when it first appeared in 1971 and the film’s unusual mixture of black comedy and cynical outrage still appears fresh today.  Screenwriter Paddy Chayefsky (who later in the ‘70s went on to pen the vicious media satire, Network) was partially inspired to write this attack on institutionalized medicine after his wife’s unhappy experience in a hospital while suffering from a neurological disorder. The incompetence and hospital staff apathy she encountered there so enraged Chayefsky that he funneled his frustrations into this screenplay, which won the 1972 Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay.  He also interviewed numerous doctors, nurses, surgeons, and administrators and poured over actual malpractice suits before his story began to take shape.  Also starring Diana Rigg, Barnard Hughes and Richard Dysart, The Hospital was directed by Oscar-nominated filmmaker Arthur Hiller (Love Story; Silver Streak).   (Dir. by Arthur Hiller, 1971, USA, 103 mins., Rated PG-13) 

Regular Loft admission prices.

 

When

7:30 p.m. March 27, 2019

Where

The Loft Cinema, 3323 East Speedway

Is water a commodity or a public good? Should water be privatized or is access to it a basic human right? Find out on March 26th as the UA Debate Series continues! It will take place in the College of Law, Room 160.

The UA Debate Series is made up of competition-winning student interns who strive to connect the college to the community through debate and discourse. All attendees of the following debate can participate by asking questions and contributing to the conversation about our topics, along with voting for the victor, who wins based off of changing the most minds of audience members. We encourage a diverse mix of students, staff, faculty, and community members to participate in the Q&A portion of our Oxford Style debate.

When

7 p.m. March 26, 2019

Where

College of Law, Room 160
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